Fall 2013 issue of HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE featuring Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, the Bolts, the Howling, Sick Puppies, Icono Pop and Moon Taxi. Get your yearly subscription or order individual copies HERE. 

Fall 2013 issue of HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE featuring Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, the Bolts, the Howling, Sick Puppies, Icono Pop and Moon Taxi. Get your yearly subscription or order individual copies HERE

REVIEW: “The early crowd in the room at the Fonda Theatre who were there for the formidable Peter Murphy had to suffer through an eight song set from main support and tour mates, Jimmy Gnecco & Ours, and suffer they did. They suffered so much that by the sixth song there were at least two yells for an encore…” as published on HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE

REVIEW: “The early crowd in the room at the Fonda Theatre who were there for the formidable Peter Murphy had to suffer through an eight song set from main support and tour mates, Jimmy Gnecco & Ours, and suffer they did. They suffered so much that by the sixth song there were at least two yells for an encore…” as published on HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE

CD REVIEW: Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s Specter at the Feast: “As with most of BRMC’s albums, what we have are two sides of a complicated coin. In the case of Specter at the Feast, it’s the mourning and the acceptance that the fight of your life is still ongoing despite what you’ve lost.”…as published on HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE

CD REVIEW: Black Rebel Motorcycle Club’s Specter at the Feast: “As with most of BRMC’s albums, what we have are two sides of a complicated coin. In the case of Specter at the Feast, it’s the mourning and the acceptance that the fight of your life is still ongoing despite what you’ve lost.”…as published on HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE

Brooklyn, NY’s own Arc & Stones release their debut EP on February 12th.
What they deliver is aggressive yet accessible, even radio-ready songs waiting to be jammed out for your approval in a club or arena near you. The music is progressive in that it’s a complete package: the instrumentation boasts nimble melodies constructing anthemic and soulful rock offerings served up handsomely by the emotional vehicle of Pellarin’s powerful and flexible voice. Girls will dig it, guys will reap the benefits: a win-win for all
Now get to know Now get to know the songs you’ll be rocking to Track By Track on HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE.

Brooklyn, NY’s own Arc & Stones release their debut EP on February 12th.

What they deliver is aggressive yet accessible, even radio-ready songs waiting to be jammed out for your approval in a club or arena near you. The music is progressive in that it’s a complete package: the instrumentation boasts nimble melodies constructing anthemic and soulful rock offerings served up handsomely by the emotional vehicle of Pellarin’s powerful and flexible voice. Girls will dig it, guys will reap the benefits: a win-win for all

Now get to know Now get to know the songs you’ll be rocking to Track By Track on HIGH VOLTAGE MAGAZINE.

blackwomeninrock
blackwomeninrock:

Danielia Cotton
It’s been four years since singer-songwriter Danielia Cotton last released an album, and one can say that her life has changed in every sort of way since then. There’s been a painful miscarriage and a battle with thyroid cancer that thankfully didn’t end Danielia’s life. These are events that have their way of unsettling even the strongest people, but Danielia found her balance in her music, and the result is her third LP: The Gun In Your Hand, set to be independently released on October 30th.
The album is a collection of the blues-y folk tunes Danielia is known for with a good dose of hard-rocking songs thrown in for good measure. “Lighthouse Keeper”, the album’s first single, is a perfect example of all these sounds rolled into one. Black Women In Rock was fortunate enough to get an email interview with Danielia to get a personal take on what it’s like to be a Black woman trying to make it in within the rock world.
How do you deal with being seen as a novelty as far as being a Black woman within a rock scene? I have never felt like that was the case, as blacks were so instrumental in the birth of rock and roll and blues. Unfortunately, we have yet to penetrate the genre to the point where a black musician playing rock is not seen as somewhat of a novelty I continue to do what I do and hope that it influences more black women and men to be a part of the rock scene.
How has breaking into the rock scene been for you? It was a little hard at first for people (record executives) to take me serious but after seeing me perform the music live, I think they quickly realized it wasn’t contrived but more a real passion and a part of who I am.
Who are your musical influences? Nona Hendryx, Jimi Hendrix, Prince, Sly and the Family Stone, Stevie Wonder, Bonnie Raitt, Donny Hathaway, Tina Turner, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones and AC/DC. The list goes on.
What advice do you have for other women trying to make it within the rock scene? Sling it just like a man and don’t fall into any of the rock cliches. Just be true to the music and the rest will figure itself out.
Connect with Danielia Cotton on Facebook
Buy the album on Amazon

blackwomeninrock:

Danielia Cotton


It’s been four years since singer-songwriter Danielia Cotton last released an album, and one can say that her life has changed in every sort of way since then. There’s been a painful miscarriage and a battle with thyroid cancer that thankfully didn’t end Danielia’s life. These are events that have their way of unsettling even the strongest people, but Danielia found her balance in her music, and the result is her third LP: The Gun In Your Hand, set to be independently released on October 30th.

The album is a collection of the blues-y folk tunes Danielia is known for with a good dose of hard-rocking songs thrown in for good measure. “Lighthouse Keeper”, the album’s first single, is a perfect example of all these sounds rolled into one. Black Women In Rock was fortunate enough to get an email interview with Danielia to get a personal take on what it’s like to be a Black woman trying to make it in within the rock world.

How do you deal with being seen as a novelty as far as being a Black woman within a rock scene? I have never felt like that was the case, as blacks were so instrumental in the birth of rock and roll and blues. Unfortunately, we have yet to penetrate the genre to the point where a black musician playing rock is not seen as somewhat of a novelty I continue to do what I do and hope that it influences more black women and men to be a part of the rock scene.

How has breaking into the rock scene been for you? It was a little hard at first for people (record executives) to take me serious but after seeing me perform the music live, I think they quickly realized it wasn’t contrived but more a real passion and a part of who I am.

Who are your musical influences? Nona Hendryx, Jimi Hendrix, Prince, Sly and the Family Stone, Stevie Wonder, Bonnie Raitt, Donny Hathaway, Tina Turner, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones and AC/DC. The list goes on.

What advice do you have for other women trying to make it within the rock scene? Sling it just like a man and don’t fall into any of the rock cliches. Just be true to the music and the rest will figure itself out.

Connect with Danielia Cotton on Facebook

Buy the album on Amazon


Tuesday night I was reminded that my presence in the audience at a concert really does count. Now when I say ‘my’ I mean “the fan”, not specifically me, “Trina Nichelle Green.” I went to see the fantastic Everest at the Troubadour in West Hollywood, CA. After the show I was at the bar talking to Joel Graves who plays guitar in the band. They’d been on the road and this was their first hometown show in a while so we were catching up. Joel said that from the stage he could see my necklace. And seeing my necklace he knew I was there…and he was glad for that.
So if you’re a music fan, just a regular fan of the stuff that a band that you really love does, don’t ever underestimate the value of your presence in that venue, in front of that stage. And not just because of the money you paid to get in the door because you’re worth so much more than that to that band.

Tuesday night I was reminded that my presence in the audience at a concert really does count. Now when I say ‘my’ I mean “the fan”, not specifically me, “Trina Nichelle Green.” I went to see the fantastic Everest at the Troubadour in West Hollywood, CA. After the show I was at the bar talking to Joel Graves who plays guitar in the band. They’d been on the road and this was their first hometown show in a while so we were catching up. Joel said that from the stage he could see my necklace. And seeing my necklace he knew I was there…and he was glad for that.

So if you’re a music fan, just a regular fan of the stuff that a band that you really love does, don’t ever underestimate the value of your presence in that venue, in front of that stage. And not just because of the money you paid to get in the door because you’re worth so much more than that to that band.